JumpIntoTheWord

Bible Engagement Blog


Leave a comment

Increasing Bible Engagement

In the Hebrew Scriptures the broad meaning for “wax” or “waxed” is “increase”. Although the Hebrew word for “wax” is translated into English as “increase” it specifically means either an “increase in increase”, or seemingly paradoxically, but nevertheless logically, an “increase in decrease”. Like where “David grew (waxed) stronger and stronger” while “Saul grew (waxed) weaker and weaker.” 2 Samuel 3:1.

Sometimes we’re doing well with our Bible engagement, and sometimes not so well (Romans 7:15). How are you doing? I’m more up than down at the moment. The more I read the Word, the more it’s reading me. But it might not be like that in a few months time. That’s because there’s an ongoing war inside me. While the Spirit inclines me to wax stronger, my flesh inclines me to wax weaker.

Which begs a question: How can we grow stronger and stronger in reading, reflecting and responding to the Word? Here are three ways to increase Bible Engagement:

Use a Bible reading guide.

I find Bible reading plans tend to be the death of me. When I hit Leviticus I’m starting to yawn and when I get to Numbers my days are numbered! Bible reading plans also feel mechanical. I want to read the Word to meet with Jesus – never to check a box simply for the sake of reading through the Bible in a year. While I don’t like reading plans, I do find reading guides helpful. Reading guides, like the Scripture Union Guides, steer the reader through the whole Bible in 4-5 years. It’s a slower reading focused on reflection and it helps me contemplate the Word in manageable portions. Most importantly, a reading guide includes suggestions on how I should apply the Word – and that’s essential.

Spice it up.

William Cowper in his poem The Task says, “Variety is the very spice of life, that gives it all its flavour.” When Bible reading seems to lose its flavour it may be helpful to spice it up. There are many ways to spice it up. Sometimes I’ll read from a different version, listen to an audio adaptation, or watch a Bible video. Children can spice it up with a free Bible game like Guardians of Ancora. Writing the Word, singing the Word, memorizing the Word, dramatizing the Word, journaling the Word, drawing the Word, or praying the Word also helps me spice it up. There are loads of online options that help us spice it up too. There’s the YouVersion app, Bible Gateway, Study Bible apps, or journaling apps for sharing readings with others like the Replicate app.

Do it together.

“Two are better than one” (Ecclesiastes 4:9). Bible engagement is easier when we do it together. Sometimes reading the Bible with a friend or family member is the only motivation that gets us into God’s Word when we’re tired, frazzled or plagued by the tyranny of the urgent. That’s because when someone else encourages us to read and reflect on God’s Word it tends to lighten the load, strengthen the discipline of Bible reading, and spur us on. Bible apps make this easy. They let you see what your friends have highlighted, enable you to read their margin comments, facilitate sharing of passages with social graphics, or make it possible to read Bible guides together. But for me, there’s nothing to beat face to face Bible engagement. Most nights I read the Bible together with my family at the dinner table. Our discussions flowing from the Bible reading are usually stimulating and grounding. And because we do Bible engagement together, it’s the glue that binds us to one another and to Jesus.

That’s it in a nutshell. Bible engagement usually increases when we use a Bible reading guide, spice it up, or do it together. So here’s to waxing stronger and stronger!

© Scripture Union Canada 2019

2 Corinthians 4:5


Leave a comment

Storying Scripture

For our spiritual well-being, after Jesus, Bible stories are what we need most in life.

Sharing Bible stories is called “storying” or “storying Scripture.” Storying is a recently coined phrase to describe the process of carefully crafting stories from Scripture so that they stay true to the original text but are told verbally in a natural and appealing way that engages the listener.

Storying Scripture can be done in two ways – word for word from the text, or not word for word.

The word for word method:

  • Someone memorizes a story from the Bible
  • The story is recited to a group of listeners
  • The listeners tell the story back to the person who recited it
  • The person who recited the story recites it again
  • Everyone discusses the meaning and application of the story

The not word for word method:

  • Someone tells a story from the Bible in their own words
  • The listeners read the story using their Bibles
  • The listeners see if the teller missed anything in the text
  • One of the listeners tells the story in their own words
  • Everyone discusses the meaning and application of the story

In both methods, once the story is told, retold and rebuilt, questions become the basis for the ensuing discussion. There are five key questions:

  • What did you notice?
  • What did you learn about God?
  • What did you learn about people/yourself?
  • How are you going to apply this story this week?
  • Who could you tell this story to?

There are many benefits to storying Scripture:

  • It’s ideal for oral preference learners
  • It’s highly relational
  • God’s Word is central
  • It builds intimacy with the story
  • It communicates from heart to heart
  • It involves everyone
  • Both tellers and listeners get to “own” the story
  • The threefold repetition of the story provides 3 different ways to “hear” it
  • An atmosphere is created through the use of body language and voice
  • It resonates across cultural or ethnic divides
  • It sounds more “alive”
  • It engages sanctified imagination
  • It’s an entry point for truth to be seeded in hearts
  • It’s reproducible
  • All ages can do it (Mary Margaret tells the story of Jonah)

There’s great power in telling stories. Since the dawn of creation people have used stories to share their history, communicate ideas, establish values, shape behaviour, advance a cause, strengthen community, and form a worldview. So here’s to storying Scripture – to doing it well – to sharing the Story in ways that transform our understanding of the world and our view of God.

Recommended Resources:

Terry, J. O., Basic Bible Storying: Preparing and Presenting Bible Stories for Evangelism, Discipleship, Training and Ministry, Church Starting Network, 2009.

Tiegreen, Chris, Story Thru the Bible: An Interactive Way to Connect with God’s Word, NavPress, 2011.

Willis, Avery T. and Mark Snowden, Truth That Sticks: How to Communicate Velcro truth in a Teflon World, NavPress, 2010.

© Scripture Union Canada 2019

2 Corinthians 4:5